The Atlanta region ranks among the worst major metro areas in the nation for putting transit services within reach of people without cars, the Brookings Institution Metropolitan Policy Program said in a report released Thursday.

Of the nation’s 100 largest metro areas, Atlanta ranks 82nd, providing 68.5 percent of its households without vehicles access to transit services, the report says. That leaves 37,634 such households out of reach, the largest number among the 100 regions studied.

- Study: Atlanta among worst regions for access to transit services  | ajc.com (via transartorialism)
from transartorialism
4-year-old hit by drunk driver. Drunk driver serves six months. Mother charged and faces THREE years.

radicallyhottoff:

sheelzebub:

[Raquel]Nelson, 30 and African-American, was convicted on the charge this week by six jurors who were not her peers: All were middle-class whites, and none had ever taken a bus in metro Atlanta. In other words, none had ever been in Nelson’s shoes:

They had never taken two buses to go grocery shopping at Wal-Mart with three kids in tow. They had never missed a transfer on the way home that caused them to wait a full hour-and-a-half with tired and hungry kids for the next bus. They had never been let off at a bus stop on a five-lane speedway, with their apartment in sight across the road, and been asked to drag those three little ones an additional half-mile-plus down the road to the nearest traffic signal and back in order to get home at last.

And they had never lost control of an over-eager four-year-old as they waited on a three-foot median for a car to pass. Nor had they watched helplessly as a driver who had had “three or four” beers and two painkillers barreled toward their child.

That’s right: Because Nelson did not lug her exhausted little ones three-tenths of a mile from the bus stop to a traffic signal in order to cross five lanes of traffic, she is guilty of vehicular homicide. Because she did as her fellow bus riders, who crossed at the same time and place, and because she did what pedestrians will do every time – take the shortest reasonable path – she is guilty of vehicular homicide.

Blog post here.

The drunk driver has a history of hit and runs.  He served six months in jail.  Nelson faces three years in jail.  Justice?

There is a petition to support her.  Please sign it.

this is what I’m talking about when I say that mothers get harsher sentences than the person who actually killed the child does. 

this is fucking horrific, all of it - and while this is the first time i’ve heard of a mother being legally punished for someone else’s deadly drunk driving, i know it’s not the first time a child has died in the past couple of years because cobb county/atlanta-area city planners couldn’t be bothered to put a crossing walk near a place where a lot of poor and transit-dependent people are known to live and work

from caprinocultura
broke vs poor

gingersomething:

RE: class

This is a copypasta of a comment I made elsewhere in a slightly different conversation, but I’d like to say something about the difference between being broke and being poor.  I am not saying any one person is one or another because I don’t know shit about other individuals’ lives specifically, but I do know that class is about much more than current income.  So here goes.

"class mobility is possible of course but it doesn’t happen overnight and something like winning the lottery doesn’t magically change it. class is a lot about the work you do, the work your FAMILY does, the level of education you have, the level of education your family has, and so on. it’s also about your cultural norms and who your peers are. it’s so much more complicated than simple income. middle class people don’t become not middle class anymore if they get laid off and have to go on unemployment.

some people are broke but not poor. they don’t have money because they spend what they earn and so can’t afford extra stuff they want. some people are poor but not broke. i’m poor but i have some extra money left over from my tax return so i bought myself a couple cool things the other day, and i’m going to the movies on tuesday. i’m not broke, i have money. but i’m still a single mom who works part time for minimum wage and receives state help.

my bf is in the first camp. he has been “broke” for most of his adult life. he doesn’t make much money, just enough to get by. he still grew up middle class in a house with two working, professional parents. everyone else in his family went to college. we have different backgrounds and different experiences with class even though we’re mostly at the same level right now.”

In addition, I’d like to say that class mobility IN EITHER DIRECTION takes times.  A middle class person is still middle class even if they’ve been homeless for a week.  But over the years that can change.  This is why people who choose to be homeless for whatever reason (not common of course but it happens), often find themselves trapped there against their will after a while.

Class is an INCREDIBLY complicated societal mechanism. I think we owe it to ourselves to not ignore this complexity and not boil things down to “how much money do you have in your pocket? none? congratulations, you are poor!”

(Source: punwitch)

from rare-basement
It really bothers me

queerriotqueen:

mewmewfoucault:

3xosc:

that I can’t find porn that has lesbian trans women in it

:(

i know there’s at least a couple vids of dyke porn featuring trans women on queerporn.tv

but, yeah, a lot of different types of misogyny have colluded to make it really really hard to find a lot of different types of representations of trans female sexuality

oh my god THIS.

Was looking for some decent lesbian trans lady porn for a partner and honestly everything I came across in the mainstream was horrible and misogynistic and cissexist and blech.

sigh, why is good queer porn expensiveeee. could always download I guess but I feel bad not contributing to small positive porn production companies.

well, a lot of (self-identified) queer and feminist porn is expensive because it doesn’t have the same corporate backing that more mainstream porn has

and even being expensive, the performers often don’t get paid nearly as well

i can’t find it b/c tumblr’s search function sucks - but stifledthoughts (who is a trans woman who has done porn for a small queer studio) wrote a post recently about how she got paid doing queer-identified porn, like, a fifth to a tenth or less of what she could have made doing more mainstream, blatantly cissexist porn

so, a lot of trans women who go into porn don’t spend their time doing feminist- or queer-IDed porn because they literally cannot afford to

and this obvs also has a big impact on the types of trans women who do end up getting represented in queer porn

(and, as besttumblr notes here, a lot of ‘queer’ porn sites are super focused on trans men and cis dykes, for lots of complicated and often shitty reasons)

(Source: vivid-eris)

from fat-fancy-fabulous
Food Deserts in the U.S. » Sociological Images
been having a lot of thoughts about this thread started by elfstaranymore
one of them is: routine grocery shopping for folks who don’t have a car very, very often sucks real bad
i live in a bigish city with bad and worsening public transit, and for the past couple of years i’ve had partners with cars: the difference in my stress and exhaustion levels around grocery shopping pre-being-able-to-shop-with-a-car-owning-person-on-a-regular-basis-without-particularly-asking and post are enormous
and even pre-boyfriends-with-cars, i had access to a bus and train system that sucked but that was, well, existent; i’m sure it’s a lot worse for folks living with even more sparse or no public transit
eta: i feel like the “without-particularly-asking” part of my pre-post delineation is more important than i see talked about much; mutual aide is great but it can be really straining for both parties when a person has to regularly request rides to the grocery store (or laundromat, courthouse, etc) from friends and family, especially of the ride-needing person doesn’t have a whole lot of time or resources to immediately ‘give back’ to the ride-giving parties
having a boyfriend who assumes that we’ll shop together because we cook together on a daily basis has been really different from having to be, on some level, reliant on the kindness of friends who aren’t domestically tied to me and won’t be benefiting in an immediate way from taking me shopping

Food Deserts in the U.S. » Sociological Images

been having a lot of thoughts about this thread started by elfstaranymore

one of them is: routine grocery shopping for folks who don’t have a car very, very often sucks real bad

i live in a bigish city with bad and worsening public transit, and for the past couple of years i’ve had partners with cars: the difference in my stress and exhaustion levels around grocery shopping pre-being-able-to-shop-with-a-car-owning-person-on-a-regular-basis-without-particularly-asking and post are enormous

and even pre-boyfriends-with-cars, i had access to a bus and train system that sucked but that was, well, existent; i’m sure it’s a lot worse for folks living with even more sparse or no public transit

eta: i feel like the “without-particularly-asking” part of my pre-post delineation is more important than i see talked about much; mutual aide is great but it can be really straining for both parties when a person has to regularly request rides to the grocery store (or laundromat, courthouse, etc) from friends and family, especially of the ride-needing person doesn’t have a whole lot of time or resources to immediately ‘give back’ to the ride-giving parties

having a boyfriend who assumes that we’ll shop together because we cook together on a daily basis has been really different from having to be, on some level, reliant on the kindness of friends who aren’t domestically tied to me and won’t be benefiting in an immediate way from taking me shopping

to teach in and lead a writing center / so that people stop dying

transartorialism quoted:

“Is it possible to teach in and lead a writing center so that people stop dying, stop bullying, stop hating? What does this Center look like? What does this kind of teaching and leading look like? What does this kind of consulting/tutoring look like?” — Moira Ozias

note-a-bear wrote:

At the same time that I understand this quote, I find it laced with privilege. Every day there are projects across the country that reach out to students and individuals that keep them from harm, that give them an outlet for their feelings and fears.

well, but there are also every day across the country projects that demean or dismiss the ways that various individuals find it enjoyable or accessible or useful to write, too, you know? there are writing-centered projects that harm and that increase or produce people’s anxiety and fear around writing and around a host of other things; the concern over finding anti-oppressive writing center pedagogies is not trivial

I think the question of tangibles coming from education and occupation is a tricky one. Yet, I see in many ways how finding the outlet for a student, for any person at all, provides an escape and a raison d’etre of sorts for most people. That is why it often pains me to see arts programs and writing courses and music lessons to get plowed under.

likewise, the above goes for arts programs in general, in and out of school and prisons - while surely they can be super important for a lot of people’s well-being and pleasure, they can also surely be limiting and coercive and normalizing

3xosc wrote a great post today on how the value and meaning and pleasure we attach to various music and musical styles is socially constructed, and it’s not at all hard to see how easy it is for many, say, school music programs to foreclose on and reject at least as much as they support and develop

and which styles of music (writing, painting, etc) get approved of and which get rejected is utterly a political (racial, class, gender, ability, etc) issue

Consider, for example, how many folks say hip-hop saved their lives? Consider, the success of alternative rehabilitation programs geared towards ex-gang bangers and ex-incarcerated folks.

consider also how many people who are already socially marginalized are pressured or required by schools or courts to spend their time and sometimes their money on ‘rehabilitation’ programs that might feel to them helpful and useful and good but might also very well feel like the demeaning and condescending waste of very limited resources, and an attempt to funnel their ways of thinking and talking about themselves into a narrowly defined little box of acceptability

So in my estimation, yes, it’s possible to create a writing center/tutelage program that provides an outlet for people, that makes them less hateful or bigoted in the rest of their lives. What it looks like? Well, that depends on the needs of the community being serviced, for indeed, the first step is to create a community for/of those participants before attempting to teach anything.

the hate and bigotry and bullying that ozias is refering to is at least as much about what the tutors do as their clients; it’s really, really important to talk about how people in teaching and leadership roles in writing center / tutoring spaces can and do participate in structural marginalization and epistemic (and other types of) violence against their clients and other people implicated in the writing process

- and also how they can work to not participate in that shit

telegantmess:tiaramerchgirl:heytherepoodle:lemdi:rugger14:lgbtlaughs



just found this via telegantmess
tiaramerchgirl wrote:

My parents are first cousins, and there are a couple of others in my family tree. It’s pretty common in South Asian cultures. No birth defects here. Sometimes I wonder if there’s a subtle classist/racist thing happening - “oh, we don’t support what those backwards people are doing!”.

which i think is a really good analysis; the weird american hating-on of cousin-marriage almost certainly has plenty to do with pretty explicit racism
at the same time, though, i think there’s also a lot of ableism going on, and a lot of classism as well
an underlying assumption of the disgusted response to cousin-marriage is often that it’s just terrible to imagine a culture which is ok with marriage practices that might slightly increase the possibility of producing children with atypical health issues or disabilities
this attitude is ableist insofar as it promotes the idea that medically atypical and disabled lives are transparently and always awful and gross and undesirable; lemdi notes:

Illinois, for one, and Indiana for another, don’t allow marriage between first cousins unless they’re past reproductive age—and you have to have proof from a physician.

that is creepy, invasive, ableist goddamn state policing of one’s reproductivity
in addition, in the u.s., i think cousin-marriage is most often associated with poor people in this really ableist-classist way: ‘they’re poor because they’re stupid, and they’re stupid because they’re inbred, they’re inbred because they let cousins marry each other!’ - a gross (in both senses of the word) biologizing and normalizing of poverty and disability
so, in short: badly designed infographic with awefully racist, classist, ableist politics
file under: queer people supporting cruddy things to argue for rights i don’t care very much about

telegantmess:tiaramerchgirl:heytherepoodle:lemdi:rugger14:lgbtlaughs

just found this via telegantmess

tiaramerchgirl wrote:

My parents are first cousins, and there are a couple of others in my family tree. It’s pretty common in South Asian cultures. No birth defects here. Sometimes I wonder if there’s a subtle classist/racist thing happening - “oh, we don’t support what those backwards people are doing!”.

which i think is a really good analysis; the weird american hating-on of cousin-marriage almost certainly has plenty to do with pretty explicit racism

at the same time, though, i think there’s also a lot of ableism going on, and a lot of classism as well

an underlying assumption of the disgusted response to cousin-marriage is often that it’s just terrible to imagine a culture which is ok with marriage practices that might slightly increase the possibility of producing children with atypical health issues or disabilities

this attitude is ableist insofar as it promotes the idea that medically atypical and disabled lives are transparently and always awful and gross and undesirable; lemdi notes:

Illinois, for one, and Indiana for another, don’t allow marriage between first cousins unless they’re past reproductive age—and you have to have proof from a physician.

that is creepy, invasive, ableist goddamn state policing of one’s reproductivity

in addition, in the u.s., i think cousin-marriage is most often associated with poor people in this really ableist-classist way: ‘they’re poor because they’re stupid, and they’re stupid because they’re inbred, they’re inbred because they let cousins marry each other!’ - a gross (in both senses of the word) biologizing and normalizing of poverty and disability

so, in short: badly designed infographic with awefully racist, classist, ableist politics

file under: queer people supporting cruddy things to argue for rights i don’t care very much about

from telegantmess