thanks, darkcloudtherainbowwarrior!

isn’t she adorbz?

- and i do really wonder how an ad with such a visibly queer/butch person got made, and what domino’s is trying to do with it

important! please help some beloved queers in portland!

3xosc:

Dear Tumblr,

     If any of you know people or jobs or people who have jobs etc in Portland, could you send them my way? I really, really want to work, especially because working beats not being able to pay rent and having absolutely no place for my partner and I to live, but, unfortunately, sending in 30 applications and having 5 interviews a week {each, not combined} isn’t enough to secure a paycheck.  If we can’t find work now, we’re going to be in a very, very dire place, and I have absolutely no idea of where we can go once this month ends except for the streets. 

At this point, if you even know places people can live temporarily for no money, something that can help with rent, etc let me know.

Thanks, A Trans Woman and Her Girlfriend

reblogging and tagging the hell out of this on the hope that someone helpful will find it

please reblog, retag, and reply to 3xosc if you have *anything* useful!

also: both these kids are smart and stylish and hard-working and charming as fuck; 3xosc has worked her ass off in restaurants and libraries and activist orgs, and her partner is a kickass artist, designer, and barista

i <3 you both

eta: here’s a link to the job openings listing on idealist.org for portland - here are the listings for seattle and oly, too, if you’ve any thought of looking for other stuff in the northwest

from vivid-eris
ameliaabreu:

Via slog,

My Pie Town reworks and re-imagines a body of images originally  photographed by Russell Lee for the United States Farm Security  Administration in 1940. Using Photoshop to modify Lee’s pictures, I have  created an imaginary, parallel world - a Pie Town populated exclusively  by women…

Such a beautiful example of not only “queering the archive”, but also using archives for subversion. Too often, I think we take the inclusion of collections in a contemporary archive to mean something totally fixed and particular. I really like the possibility that this indicates: of re-reading and re-categorizing what’s already said.

ameliaabreu:

Via slog,

My Pie Town reworks and re-imagines a body of images originally photographed by Russell Lee for the United States Farm Security Administration in 1940. Using Photoshop to modify Lee’s pictures, I have created an imaginary, parallel world - a Pie Town populated exclusively by women…

Such a beautiful example of not only “queering the archive”, but also using archives for subversion. Too often, I think we take the inclusion of collections in a contemporary archive to mean something totally fixed and particular. I really like the possibility that this indicates: of re-reading and re-categorizing what’s already said.

from ameliaabreu

radicalqueerbrownboy:

phatrix:

Queer People of Color Liberation Project - “The Brown Elephant in the Room”

For pt 2 click here

This video depicts my specific experience of being a light skinned person of color.  I finally get someone else narrate this point of view. 

liked this

liked the depiction of the kind of thing that happens when one has a parent / relative who’s significantly darker-skinned than they are, and how weirded out by and stupid people can be about that

the depiction of gentrification was lolsy but i wish sometimes there was more complicated discussion of how suburby gentrification works - at least here in atlanta, a lot of the metro suburbs are / have been very largely populated by people of color, and there are some interesting (and sometimes really fucked) things going on with race and class and gentrification as more (mostly) white and not necessarily (but also sometimes) wealthy queers and cools move in to such areas

from radicalqueerbrownboy
too real for politics

(sorry for the long post on your dashboard; read more cut is not working for me - it’s a pretty good post, though)

the combination of reading this post by neutresex and there having been some interesting interactions in the trans activist community around here lately got me thinking about race and trans stuff, and the weird way that a lot of people construct the realness of the genders of poor and/or disenfranchised trans people of color - and then identify those genders or gender politics with their own as a way of purchacing authenticity and cool points

actually, i think first i’ll write about another, similar thing that i’ve thought through better and i’ve seen happen in a whole lot in feminist and queer spaces, mostly in the context of talking about the ‘lesbian sex wars’ or the histories of butch/femme dynamics among dykes:

a person will (legitimately) point out that there are multiple histories of dyke sex and butch/femme, and that these histories very often diverge around racial lines

fair enough, and sometimes really important

but sometimes this pointing-out happens in this fucked up noble savagey way: usually a white and sex-positive identified person will talk about it with a wistful tone, saying how lucky those brown people were (and are) to be outside of arguments over sex and gender! how wonderful to be unburdened by these conflicts! - ‘cause darker (and poorer) people are just more real

too real for politics, apparently: as if middle-class white women had thoughts and opinions while black and brown and poor women just had sex

it’s so creepy and disrespectful and fetishizing, and so weirdly prevalent as a narrative

i mean what kind of sense does it make that audre lorde is hardly ever cited as a figure in the history of the sex wars when she was often pretty strongly anti-butch/femme and anti-s/m - and when many black lesbians contemporary to her were not?

zami definitely has anti-butch/femme parts, and it’s not like people are unfamiliar with it; it is and was a really widely-read book

(and what does it mean to rhetoricly fold stud/fem into butch/femme? - i haven’t though about this much yet, though it’s very much worth thinking about)

obviously black dykes did and do have politics and differences and conflicts with one another, and with people who aren’t black dykes: so why does there so often occur this weird narrative where there’s this continuous, unpunctuated history of non-white women just being real and having great, thoughtless, apolitical butch/femme sex with each other - even when that narrative necessitates ignoring a whole lot of lesbian of color histories?

as well buying right the fuck into all of these shitty ideas about non-weathy and non-white people being so much more sexual and sexually driven or whatever

i mean, i know there are a lot of reasons why: the overt racism and classism of not ‘counting’ as politics anything that doesn’t articulate itself  in certain specific raced and classed ways is a big one; there’s also this gambit - often and maybe most troublingly deployed by white people, but by no means only by white people - that tries to win its arguer points and safety by attributing realness and naturalness and authenticity to poor/marginalized people of color, and then making claims about how such people act, and then idealizing that behavior and positioning it as a natural or more perfect expression or consequence of the gambiter’s politics

and that brings me back to the trans stuff

it’s really striking the range of gender-truths that get attributed to ‘authentic’ people, you know?

there’s the explicitly noble savagesque narrative where contemporary genders operating outside of indigenous contexts and articulating themselves as non-binary are justified as really natural via an identification with ‘native american culture’ (like there’s only one), usually with reference to ‘two-spirit’ or ‘berdache’ practices

i mean it seems pretty basic that this is really often fucked up, and at least here in atlanta there’s a sparse enough native american population that it’s not such a very handy rhetorical device for most people wishing to justify their gender politics in this manner

what does happen, at times, is the theoretical collapsing of all black people - or at least all african-american people poor enough to be real - into some kind of hive mind which intermittently spits out fully formed and totally authentic trans people, who are allegedly just doing their genders sans agenda or politics, or with only enough of these things to manage a realness unburdened with ‘excessive’ reflexivity

queery and non-binaryy and academicy folks fetishing the alleged subversiveness and queerness and unself-consciousness of (certain) marginalized black trans genders and sexes; this is especially creepy when it happens in its doom-fetishizing modes which set up ostensibly genderqueer trans people of color as tragic heroes of gender, fightin’ the good fight and mostly suffering for it - all the more safe to put on a pedestal for their tragedy and because they are imagined as almost being beyond political or theoretical sway

conversely, other folks will make quite different claims, and hate on genderqueerness or non-binary articulations of trans/gender experience by explaining that black people have no truck with such privileged gender frippery: like they’re real and hardcore and serious and authentic, and have real and hardcore and serious and authentic binary genders; this can be doomy, too, when it creates this weird, grim image of powerless black trans people burdened with being the realest of the real, too oppressed or natural or ignorant to ever really interact critically with the various trans and gender discourses around them and in dire need of a white knight to defend their normalcy

and, in all of it, a whole lot of people’s articulations and needs around gender and sex and transness get lost or marginalized or reread in hurtful ways

it seems obvious to me that there are a lot of binaries and a lot of ways of articulating them, and a lot of non-binaries and ways of articulating those, and that these binaries and non-binaries occur both ephemerally and systematically, sometimes in expected and predicable ways and often not

and that lots of trans people and people with sexes or genders that get marked in whatever contexts as atypical have lots and lots of pleasures and sufferings and resistences and normalcies and successes and failures related to their genders or sexes

and that it can be damaging when any articulation of transness or gender non-conformity gets privileged over others, and that both specific binary and specific non-binary articulations can and do sometimes get privileged within certain contexts

and that the articulations that do and don’t get privileged in a given space or system often have a whole lot to do with racism and classism and ableism and sexism

and that clearly no one is actually too real for politics and that there’s often a lot of pernicious or glaring racism and classism going on when people access these narratives

and that sometimes marginalized people of color access these discourses as a way to argue for the legitimacy of their own needs and desires, sometimes in ways that fuck other people over - illustrating, if nothing else, their very real ability to speak and to think and to wield power

i’m tired of writing this post and i think it’s pretty good so far, so i think it stops about here

people are funny sometimes; really funny