shame on fidelity interior construction
someone handed this to me at the corner of courtland and gilmer in downtown today
i’m having a hard time finding anything much about it online - the atlanta carpenters union website kind of sucks - i’m wondering if anyone else knows more? if not, i can call the regional union in a while
any folks in PSA at GSU in contact with the carpenters union folks?

shame on fidelity interior construction

someone handed this to me at the corner of courtland and gilmer in downtown today

i’m having a hard time finding anything much about it online - the atlanta carpenters union website kind of sucks - i’m wondering if anyone else knows more? if not, i can call the regional union in a while

any folks in PSA at GSU in contact with the carpenters union folks?

this post was written a long time ago but i still want to reblog it

besttumblr:

start-anywhere:

transartorialism:

lowendtheory:

From Tenured Radical:

Don’t get angry about being an adjunct.  The real problem right now is that education is in chaos.  It seems pretty clear that there is no commitment among private or public institutions to return to full-time labor, and this situation is unlikely to get better in the time frame you need to establish a life and a pension plan.  Be clear about why you have decided to teach adjunct and what it has to do with moving forward in your life project. Rethink this continually, and be entirely selfish in the decisions you make. Anger at others — your undergraduate mentors for “lying” to you about graduate school (they may well have, but what did you want from it?); your graduate mentors for not having enough influence; your current employer for exploiting you (because people aren’t exploited in other professional occupations, I guess) — is unproductive and pointless.  Anger, IMHO, is often a symptom of a deep-seated shame about not having succeeded in a tangible way, and a strategy for deflecting that shame onto others because it is too darn painful.  You need to address this if it is so, because you have nothing to be ashamed of.

Anger in itself is not a terrible thing, and appropriately directed, it can lead to constructive action.  But inappropriately directed, it can cause you to start acting like a crazy person over time, which diminishes the possibility that you will acquire allies to help you move your career forward in any way at all. 

I find it difficult to imagine a more patronizing and condescending way of addressing this kind of question.  What makes it all the more problematic is that I’ve heard tenured and tenure-track professors make similar kinds of statements.  These, more often than not, are people who professionally analyze the dynamics of domination and exploitation, and yet have a really hard time confronting the extent to which the very same social contradictions they address in their analyses actually structure their profession and provide them the positions from which they write and speak.

To say that anger at being an adjunct is an unconscious effect of deep-seated shame about one’s lack of success is both to psychologize and to individualize an issue that is structural.  It is therefore to ignore that anger is a perfectly reasonable response to systems of exploitation that structure the academic profession.  When that anger gets directed at one’s advisors, perhaps it has to do with the fact that advisors—who are almost always tenured and/or tenure-track professors—tend to see their roles as advising our “work,” but in so doing, define what it means to do academic work very narrowly.  Our advisors often teach us how to perform analyses and how to strive for recognition from the academic-industrial complex, but teach us little about what it might mean to struggle against the exploitative, sexist, racist system in which we are already working.  

We learn, therefore, to identify with our topics of analysis, with our fields of study, but not with the conditions in which that work happens.  We learn to navigate a system that still imagines itself as meritocratic and to experience ourselves as special or deserving when we get awarded by it.  But we don’t tend to learn much about how those very forms of recognition and feelings of deserving and being special actually work to consolidate the conditions that exploit those with whom we work side by side.

All of this seems, to me, more than worthy of anger.  I would appreciate it if professors of Tenured Radical’s ilk did a lot less to tell me how to manage/sublimate my anger and a great deal more in joining me to help destroy the conditions that produce it.

More like Tenured Neoliberal, amirite?

go lowendtheory go

ps: adjuncthulk

pps: i’ll be angry and ashamed about anything i want to, any time i want to

this is the best; added some emphasis myself

<3s to you all

i am extraordinarily glad i’ve done my work so far in a (very small and desperately underfunded) department that’s strongly encouraged both its student employees and its non-tenured profs to regard exploitative bullshit as exploitative bullshit

(Source: lowendtheory)

from besttumblr
important! please help some beloved queers in portland!

3xosc:

Dear Tumblr,

     If any of you know people or jobs or people who have jobs etc in Portland, could you send them my way? I really, really want to work, especially because working beats not being able to pay rent and having absolutely no place for my partner and I to live, but, unfortunately, sending in 30 applications and having 5 interviews a week {each, not combined} isn’t enough to secure a paycheck.  If we can’t find work now, we’re going to be in a very, very dire place, and I have absolutely no idea of where we can go once this month ends except for the streets. 

At this point, if you even know places people can live temporarily for no money, something that can help with rent, etc let me know.

Thanks, A Trans Woman and Her Girlfriend

reblogging and tagging the hell out of this on the hope that someone helpful will find it

please reblog, retag, and reply to 3xosc if you have *anything* useful!

also: both these kids are smart and stylish and hard-working and charming as fuck; 3xosc has worked her ass off in restaurants and libraries and activist orgs, and her partner is a kickass artist, designer, and barista

i <3 you both

eta: here’s a link to the job openings listing on idealist.org for portland - here are the listings for seattle and oly, too, if you’ve any thought of looking for other stuff in the northwest

from vivid-eris
but of course, we want to pretend that those who go to grad school have long enjoyed a the kind of naïveté that is nothing other than the effect of accumulated privilege

lowendtheory:

“Many of those who embark on a PhD are [people who have been trained to experience themselves as] the smartest in their class and will have been the [“]best[“] at everything they have done [because from infancy on, they have been taught to view the results of the odds that have been so heavily stacked in their favor as the fruits of their own individual efforts.] [Many others actually haven’t, and happen to decide to enter graduate school for wild reasons, such as, for example their interest in social transformation, or their desire to learn to do research, and to have an increased measure of autonomy over their creative time, but who cares about those people anyway?] They will have amassed awards and prizes. As this year’s new crop of graduate students bounce into their research, few will be willing to accept that the system they are entering could be designed for the benefit of others [well, except for those for whom working “for the benefit of others” has been a fact of life. But of course, we want to pretend that those who go to grad school have long enjoyed a the kind of naïveté that is nothing other than the effect of accumulated privilege. You know, those people who might be shocked to learn things that are obvious to most people, such as the fact] that even hard work and brilliance may well not be enough to succeed, and that they would be better off doing something else. [Because clearly, systemic dynamics should determine individual decisions, and because and the promise of economic success should, be used to measure what is an is not a reasonable life choice.] They might use their research skills to look harder at the lot of the disposable academic. Someone should write a thesis about that. [And if they don’t think such work exists, some so-called journalists should also learn to do a google search.]”

Doctoral degrees: The disposable academic | The Economist (via literarypiano)

Sometimes you need to place the toxicity of dominant forms of rationality on blast.  Or in brackets.

from lowendtheory
After Long Fight, Farmworkers in Florida Win an Increase in Pay

xicanagrrrl:

readnfight:

After Long Fight, Farmworkers in Florida Win an Increase in Pay

The infoshop here hosted the Coalition of Immokalee Workers and Student/Farmworker Alliance a couple years ago for a speaking tour they were on about the tomato-picking industry, and I’ve been on their mailing lists since then and just found out about this:

By KRISTOFER RÍOS

IMMOKALEE, Fla. — After fighting for more than a decade for better wages, a group of Florida farmworkers has hashed out the final piece of an extraordinary agreement with local tomato growers and several big-name buyers, including the fast-food giants McDonald’s and Burger King, that will pay the pickers roughly a penny more for every pound of fruit they harvest.

Farm laborers are among the lowest-paid workers in the United States, and the agreement could add thousands of dollars to their income.

Though the hamburger chains and others agreed to the increase years ago, the money they have been paying — an estimated $2 million now held in an escrow account — could not be distributed to tomato pickers until the state’s largest trade association, which acts as a middleman, agreed to lift a ban preventing their farms from passing along the extra wages.

That happened in November, when the farmworkers’ group, the Coalition of Immokalee Workers, and the Florida Tomato Growers Exchange, a trade association, completed details of a code of conduct that included not only the wage improvement but also guarantees of increased workplace protections — like minimum-wage guarantees and a zero tolerance policy on forced and child labor — for the laborers.

Some labor experts said the agreement could set a precedent for improving working conditions and pay in other parts of the agriculture and food industries, nationally and worldwide.

The Immokalee agreement is a result of a 15-year campaign for better pay and working conditions for the roughly 33,000 tomato pickers in the state. The Coalition of Immokalee Workers represents about 4,000 of those workers, but the agreement will cover all tomato pickers who work for growers that are members of the trade association, as well as those employed by independent farms participating in the agreement.

The agreement between laborers, growers and buyers is unique because it resembles a legally binding contract that includes an accountability mechanism to ensure that tomato pickers will be treated and paid fairly, said Prof. Caroline Bettinger-Lopez, director of the Human Rights Clinic at the University of Miami School of Law.

This is really important that it’s legally binding. I worked on a campaign here when Yale-New Haven Hospital was expanding and trying to tear down people’s houses and churches in order to build new buildings (their original proposal included tearing down 50 units of housing to put a 9-story parking garage across from an seniors apartment complex and on the block with the highest rate of childhood asthma in the city). We pushed for them to sign a Community Benefits Agreement in order for them to get their zoning approved, and the Zoning Board agreed that they would have to sign a CBA to go ahead with the expansion, but the compromise was that there was a third-party abritrator but it wasn’t legally binding. So the hospital broke the agreement within 5 days of it going into place, and later on the NLRB ruled against them for breaking labor laws, but we pretty much had no recourse after that.

Anyway, all that is to say that I am very excited about agreements like this being put on paper, especially when done by workers and/or surrounding communities, but it’s really really important that it is binding and that the company can be taken to court over it. They get fucking scared, cause at that point besides the legal issues, it’s a public relations mess for them. So I am very excited for the CIW and their communities because this is a huge deal.

This means a huge increase in workers pay… well maybe not HUGE, but enough to really make a change in their lives. 

Say a worker picks and carries 150 buckets of tomatoes per day, each one weighing 32 pounds. Say they earned 45 cents per bucket before. Each bucket is now worth 77 cents, and a days work is worth $115.50 versus $67.50.

My mom currently is paid $70 dollars a day, the wage she’s been able to get for about 10 years. It would be amazing if she could get $120, she dreams of it. It would really raise her standard of living, even if she’s mostly retired and only works two days a week.

$120 versus $70 is $50 more a day, $250 more a week, $1000 more a month. $2,400 versus $1,400 for a fulltime worker. Can you imagine the difference that makes to a single mother, to a family of six, etc.?

All for a goddamn PENNY more a POUND.

Goliath can’t stand forever.

from rosas-sylvestres
Food Deserts in the U.S.&#160;» Sociological Images
been having a lot of thoughts about this thread started by elfstaranymore
one of them is: routine grocery shopping for folks who don&#8217;t have a car very, very often sucks real bad
i live in a bigish city with bad and worsening public transit, and for the past couple of years i&#8217;ve had partners with cars: the difference in my stress and exhaustion levels around grocery shopping pre-being-able-to-shop-with-a-car-owning-person-on-a-regular-basis-without-particularly-asking and post are enormous
and even pre-boyfriends-with-cars, i had access to a bus and train system that sucked but that was, well, existent; i&#8217;m sure it&#8217;s a lot worse for folks living with even more sparse or no public transit
eta: i feel like the &#8220;without-particularly-asking&#8221; part of my pre-post delineation is more important than i see talked about much; mutual aide is great but it can be really straining for both parties when a person has to regularly request rides to the grocery store (or laundromat, courthouse, etc) from friends and family, especially of the ride-needing person doesn&#8217;t have a whole lot of time or resources to immediately &#8216;give back&#8217; to the ride-giving parties
having a boyfriend who assumes that we&#8217;ll shop together because we cook together on a daily basis has been really different from having to be, on some level, reliant on the kindness of friends who aren&#8217;t domestically tied to me and won&#8217;t be benefiting in an immediate way from taking me shopping

Food Deserts in the U.S. » Sociological Images

been having a lot of thoughts about this thread started by elfstaranymore

one of them is: routine grocery shopping for folks who don’t have a car very, very often sucks real bad

i live in a bigish city with bad and worsening public transit, and for the past couple of years i’ve had partners with cars: the difference in my stress and exhaustion levels around grocery shopping pre-being-able-to-shop-with-a-car-owning-person-on-a-regular-basis-without-particularly-asking and post are enormous

and even pre-boyfriends-with-cars, i had access to a bus and train system that sucked but that was, well, existent; i’m sure it’s a lot worse for folks living with even more sparse or no public transit

eta: i feel like the “without-particularly-asking” part of my pre-post delineation is more important than i see talked about much; mutual aide is great but it can be really straining for both parties when a person has to regularly request rides to the grocery store (or laundromat, courthouse, etc) from friends and family, especially of the ride-needing person doesn’t have a whole lot of time or resources to immediately ‘give back’ to the ride-giving parties

having a boyfriend who assumes that we’ll shop together because we cook together on a daily basis has been really different from having to be, on some level, reliant on the kindness of friends who aren’t domestically tied to me and won’t be benefiting in an immediate way from taking me shopping

transartorialism:

The Simpsons - Comments about PhDs and Grad Students. [HQ] (via germanyacko)

is this what i/we have to look forward to?

probably!

before you got home yesterday, t——— was telling me how she rations out her grading to find the least soul-crushing mixture of good and bad papers possible over a given period of terribly underpaid labor

from transartorialism
very much not the same

rabbitarmy:

Ok, so that was me telling you.  But yeah, what’s being written about and who gets jobs are very much NOT THE SAME in academia.

yup yup

"So, why the emphasis on luxury goods for fair trade?"

ourcatastrophe:

it’s fine to buy Fair Trade but don’t act like you’re bringing down capitalist oppression.  the Fair Trade movement is about creating privileged consumer choices — other choices need to exist to be a contrast to Fair Trade products. 

did you know there was an equivalent to fair trade back in the nineteenth century?  you could buy sugar that was certified non-slave-grown and there was a big movement to boycott slave-grown sugar.  as far as I can tell this consumer movement did fucking jack shit to bring down the institution of slavery — it simply created an extra market. 

from browcatastrophe-deactivated2013
DEAN SPADE IS COMING TO MY SCHOOL

transartorialism:

lazz:

transartorialism:

DEAN SPADE

DEAN SPADE

DEAN SPADE

OH GOD

When where what time everything!

thursday nov 4th 6:30-7:30pm @agnes scott

!!!!!

from transartorialism